Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety
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By the Regulation amending the Construction Code (Order in Council 1062-2010 of December 1st, 2010), the Government subsequently approved the Canadian Electrical Code, Part I (Twenty-first Edition), with the applicable Québec amendments. That Code replaces the Twentieth Edition and comes into force on March 1st, 2011.

A free pocketbook related to the CE Code and to the Québec Construction Code, Chapter V - Electricity is included with the paper version of the Code.

The Québec amendments are published on blue pages and are incorporated at the beginning of the Canadian Electrical Code. A fleur de lys followed by the word "Amended" in the left margin of the Canadian Electrical Code indicates to Québec users that these Rules have been amended for Québec.

Intended Use

The Quebec Electrical Code is comprised of the Canadian Electrical Code, Part I as adopted in the Province of Quebec. It includes Quebec provincial amendments.

The Canadian Electrical Code, Part I is adopted across Canada as regulation for the installation and maintenance of electrical equipment. It is integrated with CSA electrical equipment standards (collectively known as the Canadian Electrical Code, Part II) to ensure that electrical products evaluated in accordance with the applicable Part II standard are suitable for installation in accordance with the Rules of Part I.

The Canadian Electrical Code, Part I covers all electrical work and electrical equipment operating or intended to operate at all voltages in electrical installations for buildings, structures, and premises, including factory-built relocatable and non-relocatable structures, and self-propelled marine vessels stationary for periods exceeding five months and connected to a shore supply of electricity continuously or from time to time.

Preface

This twenty-first edition of the Canadian Electrical Code, Part I, was approved by the Committee on the Canadian Electrical Code, Part I, and by the Regulatory Authority Committee at their June 2008 meetings in Calgary, Alberta.

This twenty-first edition supersedes the previous editions, published in 2006, 2002, 1998, 1994, 1990, 1986, 1982, 1978, 1975, 1972, 1969, 1966, 1962, 1958, 1953, 1947, 1939, 1935, 1930, and 1927.

A new Section 58 was added to cover requirements for passenger ropeways and similar equipment. In addition, there are significant changes to Sections 0, 10, 18, 26, 46, and 68. Sections 12 and 32 have been revised to reflect new technology and industry practices.

The designation for receptacle configuration type 5-20RA ("T-slot") has been revised to 5-20R throughout the Code, and the configuration previously designated as 5-20R is now designated 5-20RA to recognize that this configuration is being phased out. Similarly, the designations for 6-20R and 6-20RA configurations have been interchanged throughout the Code.

The term "light fixture" has been replaced by "luminaire" throughout the Code, and all references to HFT conduit have been deleted.

General arrangement

The Code is divided into numbered Sections, each covering some main division of the work. Sections 0 to 16 and 26 are considered general sections, and the other sections supplement or amend the general sections. The Sections are divided into numbered Rules, with captions for easy reference, as follows:
(a) Numbering system - With the exception of Section 38, even numbers have been used throughout to identify Sections and Rules. Rule numbers consist of the Section number separated by a hyphen from the 3- or 4-digit figure. The intention in general is that odd numbers may be used for new Rules required by interim revisions. Due to the introduction of some new Rules and the deletion of some existing Rules during the revision of each edition, the Rule numbers for any particular requirement are not always the same in successive editions.
(b) Subdivision of Rules - Rules are subdivided in the manner illustrated by Rules 8-204 and 8-206, and the subdivisions are identified as follows:
(c) Reference to other Rules, etc. - Where reference is made to two or more Rules (e.g., Rules 10-200 to 10-206), the first and last Rules mentioned are included in the reference. Where reference is made to a Subrule or Item in the same Rule, only the Subrule number and/or Item letter and the word "Subrule" or "Item" need be mentioned. If the reference is to another Rule or Section, then the Rule number and the word "Rule" shall be stated (e.g., "Rule 10-200(3)" and not "Subrule (3) of Rule 10-200").

The principal changes that have been made between the 2006 edition of the Canadian Electrical Code, Part I, and this new edition published in 2009 are marked in the text of the Code by the symbol delta (?) in the margin.

Where revisions to or deletions from the text have caused existing Rules to be renumbered, only the first renumbered Rule in the sequence is marked. Users of the Code are advised that the change markers in the text are not intended to be all-inclusive and are provided as a convenience only; such markers cannot constitute a comprehensive guide to the reorganization or revision of the Code. Care must therefore be taken not to rely on the change markers to determine the current requirements of the Code. As always, users of the Code must consider the entire Code and any local amendments

Acknowledgement

The use of material contained in the National Electrical Code is acknowledged.

Scope

The object of this Code is to establish safety standards for the installation and maintenance of electrical equipment. In its preparation, consideration has been given to the prevention of fire and shock hazards, as well as proper maintenance and operation.

The requirements in this Code address the fundamental principles of protection for safety contained in Section 131 of International Electrotechnical Commission Standard 60364-1, Electrical Installations of Buildings.

IEC 60364-1, Section 131, contains fundamental principles of protection for safety that encompass protection against electric shock, thermal effects, overcurrent, fault currents, and overvoltage. Therefore, compliance with the requirements of this Code and proper maintenance will ensure an essentially safe installation. Safe installations may be also achieved by alternatives to this Code, when such alternatives meet the fundamental safety principles of IEC 60364-1 (see Appendix K). These alternatives are intended to be used only in conjunction with acceptable means to assess compliance of these alternatives with the fundamental safety principles of IEC 60364 by the authorities enforcing this Code.

Wiring installations that do not make provision for the increasing use of electricity may be overloaded in the future, resulting in a hazardous condition. It is recommended that the initial installation have sufficient wiring capacity and that there be some provision made for wiring changes that might be required as a result of future load growth.

This Code is not intended as a design specification nor as an instruction manual for untrained persons.

This Code covers all electrical work and electrical equipment operating or intended to operate at all voltages in electrical installations for buildings, structures, and premises, including factory-built relocatable and non-relocatable structures, and self-propelled marine vessels stationary for periods exceeding five months and connected to a shore supply of electricity continuously or from time to time, with the following exceptions:
(a) installations or equipment employed by an electric, communication, or community antenna distribution system utility in the exercise of its function as a utility, as recognized by the regulatory authority having jurisdiction, and located outdoors or in buildings or sections of buildings used for that purpose;
(b) equipment and facilities that are used in the operation of an electric railway and are supplied exclusively from circuits that supply the motive power;
(c) installations or equipment used for railway signalling and railway communication purposes, and located outdoors or in buildings or sections of buildings used exclusively for such installations;
(d) aircraft; and
(e) electrical systems in ships that are regulated under Transport Canada. For mines and quarry applications, see also CAN/CSA-M421.

This Code and any standards referenced in it do not make or imply any assurance or guarantee by the authority adopting this Code with respect to life expectancy, durability, or operating performance of equipment and materials so referenced.