Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety
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>July 2013

Welcome to the New Liaison

We've freshened up the look of our newsletter while remaining committed to bringing you the latest product news and updates from CCOHS. If you have any comments or questions, we'd like to hear from you.

Keep Your Cool in Hot Weather

New poster has tips to help you safely work outdoors

Keep Your Cool in Hot Weather

Working outdoors in the summer may conjure up images of sunshine and warmth, but the soaring temperatures, humidity and poor air quality also increase the risk of dehydration, harmful UV radiation, and heat-related illnesses

Display this Keep Your Cool poster packed with safety tips for workers who take it outdoors in the sun and extreme heat. Drink up, acclimatize, cover up, shield yourself, time your tasks right, and take breaks so you can keep it cool all summer long.

Download a free PDF or purchase double-sided - English on one side, French on the other - full-color 16" x 25" copies for only $5 each.

Learn more about the poster

See all posters from CCOHS


Make a Mark for Health and Safety

Spread the safety message with new CCOHS bookmarks

Awareness Items Listing on CCOHS website

Take Time to Stretch Bookmark

Stiff and sore from sitting on the job? CCOHS recommends that workers who sit most of the day at a desk take frequent short breaks. Aim for five minutes of active rest every 60 minutes, where you find other tasks to do that don't involve sitting at the computer, or you take the time to stretch.

Distribute these new bookmarks to your workers as a handy reminder of exercises that they can do while seated at their chairs. Taking these small breaks will not only add to their productivity, but also make them feel better!

Three Basic Rights Bookmark

Share these brightly coloured bookmarks to demonstrate your commitment to workers' basic rights, and to help increase worker awareness of their rights on the job:

  • The right to know what hazards are present in the workplace;
  • The right to participate in keeping your workplace health and safe; and
  • The right to refuse work that you believe to be dangerous to yourself or your co-workers.

CCOHS bookmarks are printed double-sided, with English on one side and French on the other.


Save 25% on Featured e-Courses

Prepare for the unexpected with resources from CCOHS

Save 25% on Emergency Preparedness for Workers e-course

Do you know what to do in the event of an emergency or unexpected health and safety event? Prepare for these situations with e-courses from CCOHS. Until September 30, 2013, you can save 25% when you purchase any of the following titles:

Enter promo code SAVE25 during online checkout.

See all CCOHS e-courses

Got a workplace health & safety question? Ask us!
 

Type a word, a phrase, or ask a question.


Fighting Workplace Violence

New e-courses focus on federally-regulated workplaces

Go to the new e-course's web page

Wherever people interact at work there is a potential for violence, regardless of the location or industry. Managers, front-line supervisors, and workers in the Canadian federal jurisdiction can take the new Workplace Violence in the Canadian Federal Jurisdiction: Recognize the Risk and Take Action e-course to gain an understanding of the nature of workplace violence, the consequences of workplace violence and preventive measures that can be taken.

This one-hour online course contains information on the recognition and prevention of workplace violence, with many examples relevant to work done in federally-regulated workplaces, plus information on the requirements for the prevention of violence under the Canada Labour Code, Part II.

If you need to develop and implement a workplace violence prevention program at your federally-regulated organization, the Workplace Violence in the Canadian Federal Jurisdiction - Establish a Prevention Program e-course is recommended.

You will gain the necessary knowledge and have the right tools to take action to eliminate or minimize the potential for workplace violence, and to establish a program in compliance with the Canada Labour Code, Part II requirements.

More resources on workplace violence


Get GHS Ready with CANWrite

Produce OSHA GHS & current WHMIS compliant data sheets

CANWrite product web page

Need to write material safety data sheets? CCOHS has launched CANWrite GHS, based on OSHA HazCom 2012 (with GHS classes, SDS, labels, etc.). CANWrite GHS will produce an OSHA GHS & current WHMIS compliant data sheet, so authors can readily create (M)SDSs that meet both Canadian WHMIS and US OSHA requirements.

CANWrite GHS features include:

  • The ability to produce a 16-section (M)SDS that meets US Hazard Communication Standard 1994 or 2012 and current Canadian WHMIS requirements, which includes:
    • A detailed GHS OSHA classification worksheet (HazCom 2012), an OSHA hazard determination worksheet (HazCom 1994), and a GHS Audit tool which checks for OSHA-GHS required information on the SDS.
    • A detailed WHMIS classification worksheet and a WHMIS audit tool for both ANSI MSDSs and GHS SDSs.
  • Built-in logic which links key hazards to appropriate hazard controls.
  • Integrated access to reliable and comprehensive chemical hazard and regulatory information resources (e.g. RTECS«, CHEMINFO).
  • An auto-population feature for easy maintenance of exposure limits, carcinogenicity, and acute lethality and aquatic toxicity data.
  • The ability to generate clear language phrases in English, French, and Latin American Spanish.

Learn more about CANWrite GHS

Resources on GHS:

WHMIS After GHS: Preparing for Change - Guide

This 42-page publication provides an overview of the anticipated changes to the WHMIS system after GHS principles are adopted. While exact details of the revised legislation will not be known when it is published in the Canada Gazette II, sufficient information is known to encourage workplaces to begin preparing for changes. This overview covers the basics of classification, safety data sheets, symbols and pictograms, labels, hazard statements, and precautionary statements.

WHMIS After GHS For Employers - Webinar

Employers, what does GHS mean to you? In this 45-minute recorded webinar, Sandy Bello from CCOHS provides a quick overview of GHS as it relates to WHMIS, identifies what's new, what's changed, what's stayed the same and important timelines. Plus learn about pictograms, signal words, hazard statements and precautionary statements.

GHS Pictograms Bookmark

Distribute this bookmark of the GHS pictograms and hazards to workers as a handy reminder. It's printed double-sided, with English on one side and French on the other.

Courses:

Posters:

Publications:


Not-So-Good Vibrations

Learn about the hazards of vibrations in our latest podcast

Vibration Hazards in the Workplace podcast

While the human body is built to be mobile, it was not meant to vibrate. In small doses, vibration is harmless. Unfortunately, mechanization has introduced significant vibration hazards to the workplace. Although injuries and illness from vibration are preventable, the effects of regular and frequent exposure to vibration can be disabling and permanent.

CCOHS' latest podcast discusses causes and symptoms of hand-arm and whole body vibrations, and what employers and employees can do to address the risks.

Listen to the podcast

Every month, we release new podcasts on current and emerging health and safety topics. Simply download these episodes to your computer or MP3 player and listen to them at your own convenience.

See all CCOHS podcasts

Subscribe on iTunes


About LIAISON

LIAISON, a publication of the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS) is published bi-monthly for distribution to CCOHS clients and opt-in newsletter subscribers.

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We welcome your comments. Feel free to contact us anytime.

 

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