Dick Martin Scholarship Award

CALL FOR ENTRIES

Deadline for Entries

Essays are to be received no later than 11:59 p.m. EST on January 31st of each year. Submissions received after the deadline will not be considered.

The CCOHS Council of Governors established this scholarship fund in 2002 in the memory of Dick Martin, a tireless health and safety advocate and a pioneer of workplace health and safety in Canada.

Awarded annually, this $3,000 national scholarship is available to any student enrolled, either full-time or part-time, in an occupational health and safety related course or program leading to an occupational health and safety certificate, diploma or degree at an accredited college or university in Canada. Programs include mine safety, occupational or industrial health and safety, industrial hygiene, safety management or other related safety degree program.

To apply for the award, post secondary students are invited to submit a 1,000-1,200 word essay, cover letter and completed online application form.

Scholarship Opportunity; Deadline: January 31st

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Award Criteria

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Award

Two awards of $3,000 each will be granted to one college and one university student.

An award of $500 will be granted to each of the winning students' academic institutions.

Eligibility

Any student* enrolled, either full-time or part-time, in an occupational health and safety (OHS) related course or program at an accredited Canadian college or university leading to a certificate, diploma or degree in OHS. Programs include mine safety, occupational or industrial health and safety, industrial hygiene, safety management or other related safety program.

*Student does not have to be Canadian however they need to must be enrolled in a Canadian school.

Note: CCOHS employees, children or relatives of employees are not eligible for this scholarship award.

Application

All submissions must include a completed online application form, cover letter and essay (applicants will be evaluated based on the submission and completion of all three documents). A Selection Committee will score the applications based on the following criteria:

Completed online application form, which includes information such as:

  • Applicants name and contact details
  • School and program information including program coordinators contact details
  • List of applicant's academic achievements
  • Outline of demonstrated leadership and civic activities
  • Two references from a non-family member or personal friend

One page cover letter:

  • Outlines your aspirations of obtaining a career in health and safety industry.
  • Must be word processed in a 12-point font, double-spaced

1,000-1,200 word essay on ONE of the following:

  • Prevention Essay: How would you work to solve and create awareness about workplace violence?
  • Technical Essay: Research an existing or emerging hazard or risk (coverage may include how to identify, assess and control the risks).

Criteria

Essay and Cover Letter will be judged on the following criteria:

  • Word processed in a 12-point font, double-spaced.
  • Word count must be included.
  • Pages must be numbered.
  • Essays must include a bibliography.
  • Applicant's name must not NOT appear on any page of the essay.

Evaluation

Marks on the entire application package will be weighted as follows:

  • Application – 15%
  • Letter– 25%
  • Essay – 60%

The Essay will be evaluated based on:

  • Intellectual content (original, thought-provoking) - 50%
  • Practical value – 20%
  • Theoretical value – 20%
  • Presentation and style – 10%

*Applications submitted with missing information from the list above will be evaluated as is.

Ownership

All essays submitted become the property of CCOHS. Successful essays will be published by CCOHS and may be, along with information about the winners, shared widely through our web site, government agencies, and media.

Submission

Applications will be accepted starting October 1st, of each year through our online application form. Please contact us if you have any questions.

Deadline

Essays are to be received no later than 11:59 p.m. EST on January 31st of each year. Submissions received after the deadline will not be considered.

Notification

All applicants will be notified of the Selection Committee's decision.

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About Dick Martin

Photo of Dick Martin
Dick Martin
1944–2001

Dick Martin, a CCOHS Governor, died of cancer in October 2001 at the age of 57. In the spring of 2002 the CCOHS Council of Governors established an occupational health and safety scholarship fund in his memory.

Dick Martin joined the CCOHS Council in its early days and returned again, ending his second term in 2000. He was instrumental in the establishment in 1984 of the Canadian National Day of Mourning, April 28, to honour workers killed or injured on the job. The Day of Mourning, timed with the country's first comprehensive workers' compensation legislation, is now recognized in 80 countries. Martin, born in southern Ontario, became a labour activist after he took a job in a nickel mine in Thompson, Manitoba. He once described the conditions as "appalling". Eventually, Martin became president of his steelworkers' local, which led to a six-year presidency of the Manitoba Federation of Labour. In 1982, he became the founding chairperson of the board of directors of the MFL Occupational Health Centre, the first of its kind in Canada.

Two years later, Martin was elected an Executive Vice-President of the Canadian Labour Congress and, in 1992, elected by acclamation as Secretary-Treasurer. "Dick will be remembered across the country and around the world for his fervour in advancing the cause of health and safety in the workplace and his strong-minded anti-poverty activism," said Nancy Riche, who succeeded Martin as Secretary-Treasurer. In 1997, he was elected president of the 43-million member Inter-American Regional Labour Organization (ORIT), the only English-speaking president in the organization since it was founded in 1949.

His Principles and Values*

Dick Martin was an outstanding personality and an extraordinary Canadian. He also had a set of principles and values that guided his work in the labour movement and Canadian society.

Dick Martin came to the labour movement with the core values that all trade unionist share. The dignity of labour means workers' rights and good working conditions such as a safe, clean, healthy and stress-free workplace. These are achieved by union workplace organization, activism at work and collective bargaining with the employer. Workers' ability to achieve their goals depended on political action aimed at good labour laws and safety standards.

One of Dick's major achievements in health and safety was to take a leading part in the establishment of April 28, the annual Day of Mourning for Workers Killed and Injured at Work as a national, then international, event. He also took a leading role as a Governor of Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS) in promoting the Centre as Canada's major national organization for health and safety.

Dick's core values included this traditional approach but his principles were wider and deeper. He believed in unions that did far more than improve pay, benefits, rights, and working conditions. He saw unions as social as well as industrial organizations, which were active in the community, and which extended workplace activism to goals that benefited communities and then the wider society.

For instance, he saw pollution as something that poisoned workers; but the same pollution also poisoned the local community and the general environment. As an environmentalist, he saw pollution as a social evil that concerned us all and had to be tackled in ways that benefited both workers and their communities. He was a pioneer in believing that unions had to work for environmental protection but his particular contribution was to see workplace action and social action on pollution as two aspects of one and the same thing.

In doing so, he again led the labour movement to new horizons. The idea of "sustainable development" arose in the public consciousness during the 1990's. The concept then had a rough ride in society, partly because there was little agreement as to what sustainable development meant and entailed, partly because it became a cliche, partly because the idea was co-opted by parties who had no interest at all in sustainable development, no interest in social change. But Dick grasped that the idea meant a new society in which economic development, environmental protection and social justice were all to be part of a single program - and that labour had a key part to play in all these aspects of sustainable development. He was a far-sighted advocate of what has become a mainstream progressive movement.

Canada has much to thank Dick Martin for, not only for what he achieved but also for what he stood for.

* Provided by the Canadian Labour Congress

Donations

At Mr. Martin's request, donations in his memory are received by CCOHS,and used to create maintain a scholarship in his name.

To make a donation to this scholarship fund please contact CCOHS at 1-800-668-4284 or e-mail scholarship@ccohs.ca.

Tax receipts are issued for all donations received.

FAQs

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I am a (non-Canadian citizen) student studying outside of Canada. Do I qualify?

No. While you do not need to be a Canadian citizen, you must be currently enrolled in an accredited Canadian university of college, in a program that has an occupational health and safety component.

I am a Canadian citizen studying at occupational health and safety at a school outside of Canada. Do I qualify?

No. You must be currently enrolled in an accredited Canadian university or college. International schools do not qualify.

How do I know if my program fits the definition of 'occupational health and safety'?

If you are unsure as to whether or not your program qualifies, please email scholarship@ccohs.ca with a copy of your course description or syllabus. The Dick Martin Scholarship Award committee will review it and determine if it does qualify.

If I have been accepted into a program, but not currently enrolled in it, do I qualify?

No, you must be currently enrolled to qualify.

If I win, must I direct the money towards my tuition?

No, the scholarship award money can be used at your discretion. The award is not based on financial need.

Is it ok if my essay runs a little bit over the 1200 word count limit?

Essays must conform to the guidelines as stated on the website. Failure to do so will result in your application being disqualified.

Essay and Cover Letter will be judged on the following criteria:

  • Word processed in a 12-point font, double-spaced.
  • Word count.
  • Pages must be numbered.
  • Essays must include a bibliography.
  • Applicant's name must not appear on any page of the essay.

Do I need to supply two reference letters?

You do not need to supply actual reference letters. The online application form only requires you to supply two reference names and their contact information. If you are selected as winner, the committee will contact your references to verify your information, before declaring you the winner.

Do I have to include footnotes in my essay?

Yes. If you reference a source, you must include a footnote indicating where the source originated. Footnotes do not count towards your overall essay word count.

To whom should I address my cover letter?

You can simply address it to the Selection Committee.

How is my submission evaluated?

Marks on the entire application package will be weighted as follows: Application – 15%, Letter– 25% and Essay – 60%.

The Essay will be evaluated based on:

  • Intellectual content (original, thought-provoking) - 50%
  • Practical value – 20%
  • Theoretical value – 20%
  • Presentation and style – 10%

Do you have any tips on how I can make my submission stand out?

Essays that stand out are ones that present theoretical knowledge and findings (statistics, studies, etc.) with practical knowledge (gained from work or personal experience) in an interesting, thought-provoking way.

Cover letters should clearly articulate why the applicant is interested in a career in occupational health and safety and how the Dick Martin Scholarship Award would assist them in furthering their career goals. Remember, the scholarship is not based on financial need, but rather a keen desire to help improve health and safety for workers.

When are the winners announced?

Two winners (one from a college and one from a university) will be announced in early May during North American Occupational Health and Safety (NAOSH) Week. Winners are notified by telephone or email. CCOHS will also issue a news release during NAOSH week with the names of the winners.

Are there any restrictions for the use of the $500 given to the academic institutions of the winners?

No. The schools can use the money at their discretion. Possible uses might include general bursary funds, upgrades to faculty equipment or resources, or donations to local charities.

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Promotion

To promote the Dick Martin Scholarship Award at your institution, Contact Us and we will provide you with posters and brochures to use in your promotional efforts. We thank you in advance for your efforts in supporting this scholarship opportunity!

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